Lil' Bug Out Tent


    Overview:

    The Patent Pending Ultralight Lil’ Bug Out tent is a modular lightweight pyramid / tipi hybrid shelter that is optimized for flexibility, livability and performance. It is a capable ultralight tent. The Lil’ Bug Out is for those that camp in a variety of conditions and want to be flexible. Due to it’s zipper orientation, the Lil’ Bug Out is an incredibly livable shelter. The Lil’ Bug Out can be pitched using linked trekking poles, a trekking pole and an adapter or one of our robust carbon fiber poles for optimum performance.

    Features:

    • Modular: From lightweight emergency shelter to 6 person capable
    • Inner Nest Compatible, the nest can be left attached
    • Tent can be pitched quickly in the rain with tent interior protected during pitching
    • Use a trekking pole, trekking pole and extender, or carbon pole
    • Storm Worthy
    • Dual doors for easy in and out and great livabilty
    • Pitches easily and quickly
    • Sod Skirt and Vent

    Build and Buy your Ultralight Tent now. Starting at $205.00

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    Possible Configurations:

    Since the LBO is so versatile there are many ways it can be configured. Below are the possible ways it can be used as a fully enclosed shelter.

    • Bug Out Base + 3 Piece Vestibule (74 Sq Feet, 64″ Tall, Canopy 26 ounces, 2 entrances, Cuben 17 ounces)
    • Bug Out Base + Bug Out Base (86 sq feet , 64″ tall, Canopy 32 ounces, 2 entrances Cuben 21 ounces)
    • Bug Out Base + Tarp Connector + Bug Out Base (130 sq feet, 64″ tall, Canopy 48 ounces, 4 entrances, Cuben 35 ounces)

    Several other options exist for a partially enclosed shelter from just using a trekking to using the bug out or tarp section alone or with other components.

    Sizing:

    The following drawing show approximate sizes of the various configurations when pitched in a fully closed mode. Click on photo for larger images. When used with a lower pole , square footage will increase slightly and one entrance will be partially open.

    Lil Bug Out and 3 Part Vestibule:

    Height 64 – 66 inches, Square Footage 72, Dual Entrances

    Lil Bug Out and 3 Part Vestibule

    Lil Bug Out and 3 Part Vestibule

    Lil’ Bug Out Base and Little Bug Out Base:

    Height 64″ , approximate sq footage 86, 2 entrances / exits

    Two Lil’ Bug Out Bases and a connecting Tarp:

    Height 64″ , approx sq footage 130 , 4 entrances / exits

    Dual Bases and Connecting Tarp

    Dual Bases and Connecting Tarp


    Materials:

    • Cone – 2 Layers Cordura reinforced
    • Tie outs –  box stitched Cordura
    • Center pole – Trekking pole, Trekking Pole + adapter,  or Carbon Fiber
    • Stakes – Not included
    • Zipper – YKK #8 coil door

    Canopy:

    • Green: Cuben Fiber 2k.18
    • Redwood Brown: 30D nylon, High Tenacity 6.6 thread, with silicone coating, waterproof rating minimum 2000 mm – 3000 mm hydrostatic head. This material is very waterproof and very strong for it’s weight.


    Weights:

    • Base Bug Out  – This is the main part. Used on it’s own it can be a tarp or 3 sided shelter covering about 43 sq feet. In addition, two can be mated together to create a shelter that is 86 sq feet. Weight 16 ounces.
    • 3 Piece Vestibule – Weight 10 ounces (with stove jack), 8 without.
    • Tarp connector – This adds about 44 sq feet. When used with two base bug outs it creates a shelter that is almost 130 sq feet.  Weight 14 ounces with zipper.
    • 2 Person nest – This works in conjunction with the base bug out and creates a fully enclosed 2 person inner tent. Weight 20 ounces.



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    Backpackinglight.com Review Backpackinglight review

    Independent Lil’ Bug Out Overview from the Life above 10k blog

    We started the trip off leaving Anchorage and flying into Kodiak on the morning of October 3, with the plans of taking a beaver load out of Kodiak later on that morning and flying into a high alpine lake. A couple hours after getting into Kodiak, our bush transporter contacted us and told us that he had just received an email from the feds, stating that because of the government shutdown, he was not allowed to fly us anywhere on Kodiak that was Federal Reserve land. Over 80% of the island is Federal Reserve land, and the area that we were looking at going to was all Federal Reserve. Due to bad weather we weren’t able to fly out that day anyway, so we spent the night in Kodiak, with the hopes now of flying out and landing somewhere in the saltwater to start our hunt the following day. So on October 4 we left the town of Kodiak and started flying south along the coastline looking for goats and a good place to land where it wouldn’t be too difficult to access them. We ended up flying all the way down to the southern tip of the island and started our hunt from there. After setting up my SO 12 person tipi to use as a base camp, we started our bushwhack up the mountain towards goat country. It took us the rest of that day and most of the next day to get up to the elevation where the goats were. I chose to use one of your LBO shelters with the vestibule for this hunt, and I was a little apprehensive about doing so, as I have never used a floorless shelter on an extended trip like this.
    Kodiak island weather in October can be pretty unforgiving and this trip proved to be a good example of that. In the eight days that we spent on top of the mountain we experienced everything from sunny 50° to fog so thick you couldn’t see more than 50 feet, and for almost 2 days we experienced the remnants of a typhoon that had blown through the Philippines earlier the week before, and hammered us with torrential rains and 90 mph winds. We had set up in a little depression that allowed us some protection from the winds, so I don’t believe that we experienced the full force of those winds, but we did experience some very strong gusts nonetheless. Of the eight days total of hunting, I spent almost 72 hours holed up in the tent because of weather.
    We ended up going two for three on the goats and all in all had a very successful and enjoyable hunt. The LBO performed flawlessly, and after living in that shelter and experiencing the weather that we experienced I would feel confident taking that tent on any of my Alaska hunts. I look forward to seeing how the LBO handles a good snow load, and plan on using it later on this winter for just that purpose.
    Thanks again very much for the great products that you guys make. You have turned this floor less shelter skeptic into a believer, and I plan on using these shelters for many years to come.
    Take care,

    Greg Borton
    Chugiak, AK.

    Lil’ Bug Out Setup

    These instructions are for the most common fully enclosed configuration of the LBO. This includes the following configurations.

    • Base + Vestibule
    • Base + Base
    • Base + Tarp + Base

    Setup Video:

    This setup video is for a Base and 3 Part vestibule and a nest since this is the trickiest setup. It is a bit long, but gives an overview of most configurations. The most basic principle of this setup is creating a triangle between the two rear corners and the center of the vestibule. This keeps the geometry centered side to side. The nest can connect directly to the rear corners, and be staked on the side or you can use a little cordage on each line lock of the nest to give it more flexibility. Raising the nest it is easiest to use the basket of a trekking pole and the provided line loc, or on a carbon pole (or even a stick) using a prusik on the pole. The video provides pretty full details.

    Setup Basics:

    Setup is very simple in each of these configurations once you understand a couple basic concepts that are used for each configuration.

    • Setback – This refers to pulling a tie out relatively taught and setting back (towards the center of the tent) a certain distance and setting a stake.
    • Every configuration starts with setting the two rear corner stakes of the base (dark fabric) and then pulling the center of the opposite side taught and setting a stake at the desired setback. The first three stakes should look like a triangle. In the base +base or base + tarp + base configuration this is necessary to create a proper square since the triangle finds the center of the opposite side.
    • The rear portion can be setup square or as more of tipi style. Either setup is fine, it just depends on how you want to set it up. To set up the rear section square simply set the rear corners taught. To set the rear section so the middle extends out set the stakes to the width of the fabric (not the tie outs). The easiest way to do this is to set one corner stake, pull the other side taught and fold the stake loop back towards the first stake and set the stake back.

    Setup: Base + Vestibule:

    • Set the rear corners as mentioned above. If you want the rear square, set the stake taught, if you want to use the angle set the corners to fabric width (not stake out width).
    • Pull the center of the vestibule out and set a stake using a 4″ setback
    • Insert the pole to roughly 66″. Tension from the corners should be very similar.
    • Set the door stakes
    • Optional: Set the rear middle stake or guy out points
    • Optional: guy out front beak

    Setup: Base + 3 Piece Vestibule:

    • Set the rear corners as mentioned above. If you want the rear square, set the stake taught, if you want to use the angle set the corners to fabric width (not stake out width).
    • Pull the center two stake outs of the vestibule out and stake. Make sure it is moderately taught.
    • Insert the pole set to about 64 inches. The four stakes outs should be reasonable taught. Stake the sides by the zipper. We prefer to stake it on the base section of the Lil’ Bug Out. .
    • Set other stakes or guy out points as desired.

    Setup: Base + Base:

    • Set the rear corners as mentioned above. If you want the rear square, set the stake taught, if you want to use the angle set the corners to fabric width (not stake out width).
    • Pull the center of the second base unit out and set a stake using a 12″ setback. This will make a triangle, that can be used to square the tent
    • Stake the rear corners of the second base unit, pull these taught from the first bug out portion
    • Insert the pole to roughly 64″. Tension from the corners should be very similar.
    • Set the door stakes
    • Optional: Set the rear middle stake or guy out points
    • Optional: guy out front beak

    Setup: Base + Tarp + Base:

    • Set the rear corners as mentioned above. If you want the rear square, set the stake taught, if you want to use the angle set the corners to fabric width (not stake out width).
    • Pull the center of the second base unit out and set a stake using a 7″ setback. This will make a triangle, that can be used to square the tent
    • Stake the rear corners of the second base unit, pull these taught from the first bug out portion
    • Insert the two poles to roughly 64″. Tension from the corners should be very similar.
    • Set the door stakes
    • Optional: Set the rear middle stake or guy out points

    Can I pitch it using trekking poles ?

    Yes. If you pitch just using one trekking pole one side will be open. To pitch it to optimal height you will need to join trekking poles or use a trekking pole extender.

    Can I leave it nest attached ?

    Yes. First determine how you want to pitch it. Then install the nest and tension it using line locs. Now you can treat it as one tent and pitch it all at once. The nest is even protected during pitching like this and it goes up very quickly.

    Can this tent take a wood stove ?

    Yes. A stove can go in any number of places. We prefer using one in the tarp connector, but one can go in the vestibule or an extra base unit